Certified Nexus Devices

Fragmentation
Tasty (fragmented) treats

The latest rumor on the Android fragmentation front is a god-send to most Android fans.

If true, this could be as much as a sea change as the Sprint/Softbank merger is to the  telecommunications front. Or on the same scale of Windows Mobile becoming Windows Phone.

As of late, Android has really taking some heat because of fragmentation.

The wise among the Android collective know, however, that even devices running version of Android going back to 2.1 are still very capable with a solid operating system. Android doesn’t suffer from security being neglected on older versions in that, Google fixes security related issues server side. Then once a 2.1 device communicates at any point to the Google server, it is updated with the latest security and/or browser patches required to keep each user safe.

On top of that, Google has made it so that core Google applications are compatible with versions of Android going as far back as Android version 1.6. But to the consumer who becomes aware of the fact that there are newer versions of Android that may be compatible with their device, it’s natural to desire the upgrade. Even though, just like on an older Windows machine, some devices just do not have the muscle to enjoy the latest megabytes being applied to its hardware.

In which case, most manufacturers are leaving some older devices behind (once again, similar to how Nokia is doing with its older Lumia devices). But what’s being told by an anonymous source to AndroidandMe.com is about to change all of this.

We’ve heard before of operating system developers requiring specific hardware on a device for optimal performance. It seems as if Google is taking this stance as well with what is being dubbed the ‘Certified Nexus Device” program. In this program, a manufacturer could apply for this designation, build a device to Google’s specification, then the device will operate as do all Google Nexus devices. Receiving more updates than you can shake a stick at.

The devices will not need to carry the Nexus title in their name, rather it will be a stamp of approval from Google. The rumored requirements will force new smartphones to ship with stock Android and pack sufficient power to run mobile games made specifically for the Nexus brand. In addition, each Google-approved device will need to support Google Wallet through built-in NFC.

Also, the consumer does not have to worry about the carrier sending OTA’s to the device whenever it feels it has the time. It’s what is known as a ‘pure Google experience’, versus a manufacturer branded or carrier bloat-ware loaded device. For most Android enthusiast, this is welcomed.

You get the newest updates for your device (until your device is not able to handle the load any more of course…even though Android 4.o was loaded on the very first Android device made) when Google releases them for your upgrading pleasure. Besides the prestige that comes along with the Nexus brand, the devices will feature a new media streaming service offered via Google Play and access to games that will only function on Nexus products.

All very much welcomed by me and i’m sure most of the (as of this writing) 480+ million Android device users.  The next Google event takes place on 10/26/2012, being put on by LG. The predominant thought is that a few of these ‘Certified Nexus’ devices could be introduced there. Stay tuned, Mobility Digest will be monitoring this and all other Android events to bring you the latest news.

 

AndroidAndMe

2 COMMENTS

  1. As of late it’s taking heat on fragmentation? You mean as of when they didn’t restrict the Google badge to Android phones that are only WVGA? Windows Phone, which in the spirit of going backwards hardware wise actually started selling phones, I’m told, that don’t even have enough ram (256MB) to run Skype and Angry Birds. But let’s not get started with a platform fight.

    I can’t say I like this Nexus device dilution. The Nexus brand serves as a function of a reference of what Google thinks those making Android phones should strive for until they figure out something better, and I like owning that single phone for a while. Spreading the love is nice if I dislike the sound of LG versus Sony or whoever, but I just like owning The Google phone one Google phone at a time.

    Also I think this will lead to an escalation of popularity of the Nexus line which will expose it to greater pressure to cave to demands of OEMs and carriers, I think it will bring way too many chefs into the kitchen. Basically I think Andy Rubin, Eric Schmidt and maybe a couple others at Google, Marissa Mayer if they can get her to toss them a bone of advice, should decide which OEM to tap, not OEMs plural.

    One person carries the Olympic torch at a time, you know?

    > We’ve heard before of operating system developers requiring specific hardware
    > on a device for optimal performance. It seems as if Google is taking this stance
    > as well

    That’s not true. From the beginning, or at least when I first bought a Google phone (the Nexus One), there has been a pretty long list of device requirements (click here or here). Granted, the standards are more liberal than those of WP, but I believe all Android apps ever made are still forward-compatible (the oldest apps can still run on the newest devices). Not much of a concern to Microsoft, is it. Not much of a concern to me either as an Android user, but it’s impressive nonetheless.

    > Receiving more updates than you can shake a stick at.
    Why is everyone so obsessed with Android version updates? I appreciate a good Google Maps or Gmail update, but I’m sort of outgrowing updating my rom all the time, grabbing almost every nightly without even reading the changelog. Windows Phone users dying for updates, that I can understand as it’s a young platform in need of some polishing, but Android, at least the one on my Nexus (actually all three of them), is damn good. And I’ve spent plenty of time on Blackberries, iPhones, iPads and even a Windows Phone to say that with some authority. Hell I ran http://blownfuze.org.

    > Also, the consumer does not have to worry about the carrier sending OTA’s …
    > versus a manufacturer branded or carrier bloat-ware loaded device.
    No one, except some suit at AT&T maybe, would disagree with that. On the other hand most people walking into an AT&T joint wouldn’t know what you’re talking about.

    > offered via Google Play
    I think I’m starting to like “Play” and that they made the right call, calling it that, and centering other services than just the app market around it.

    > 480+ million Android device users.
    Not bad, right? And 1.3 million activations a day. To me that says Google, not unlike Apple, has made an impression among consumers that they’re good at this phone thing.

    > The next Google event takes place on 10/26/2012, being put on by LG.
    I should just ask Wikipedia but what is LG? Don’t they make low-end monitors and washing machines? Hmm.

    Good article Jay, nice to meet you.

  2. I like this idea, and that it may be coming is not a surprise for me. I’ve been saying: companies will imitate a wildly successful competitor, and Apple, with its Total Control, is seen as a wildly successful competitor.

    “Why is everyone so obsessed with Android version updates?”
    I would amend this to “any OS version updates.” One word: SHINY!!!!!!!

Comments are closed.