The Wall Street Journal is running a poll asking readers, “Who makes the best mobile operating system?”

You can take the poll yourself and find out the results and let the suspense build up in order to find out the results, or if you’d prefer I’ll just go ahead and spoil it for you, dumping their poll results as of the time of my posting this:

Well how about that. I’m well aware that Google makes the best mobile OS but still, you think it would be Apple dominating this, right? At least with their audience? Or RIM maybe for the Wall Street crowd? Nope, single digits for RIM, Apple getting a little over a third of Google’s vote share. How about that.

Oh wait look, there’s Microsoft, a solid half a percent above Other.

Doug Simmons

Hey I got an idea. Let’s compare audiences with the Journal and see what you guys think of the same question in this here poll.

[poll id=”40″]

13 COMMENTS

  1. Good point. It’s like every single time I turn on cnbc they’re talking about the xbox360. Flipping through the Journal, i see at least one xbox360 game half page ad per section.

  2. Well, its gonna be tought, but if Microsoft manages to spread the word like they did with xbox 360, they do have a chance of catching up…

  3. Doug you can’t seriously believe MS won’t capture back a good portion of the Mobile market. There are plenty of people who would rather use a platform that is intuitive and new (if not complete yet) over the one-size-fits-all-app-driven-tied-to-iTunes-boring platform. Let’s not even get into the security risks of Android for the business side of things. MS might initially take market share from RIM (especially with phones like the Dell Venue Pro) but gradually as the WP platform matures and the handsets come out people will realize the benefits of the UI and integration of the social media and MS outlook products not to mention xbox360. WP just made a stab at the youth and will win. WP is going to be like Windows 7 for sure. Everyone was saying after Vista how Windows was dead and Apple is going to profit huge. Look how that ended up. MS posting it’s biggest gains in years and their market share growing yet larger. Apple will continue to succeed as long as they keep pushing out better and better phones and selling them cheap but to say MS will fail is illogical.

  4. I must say Doug, I’m looking forward to your follow up post where, out of your innate sense of fairness, you’ll want to note how very different the poll results are looking now…

  5. Yeah? Why don’t you write it for me as you seem to think you know how I’d account for the collaborative adjusting of these figures.

  6. You have me at a loss Doug. I’m sure no-one would need to ask you to account for any ‘collaborative adjusting’, I’m certain we can all appreciate the nature of online polls and how they get promoted by the ‘supporters’ of the various options (especially, perhaps, in the wake of anyone looking at an early rush of success and making something of the results a little prematurely, and in the face of the fact that an internet poll is so easily gamed as to be less indicative of reality than reading tea-leaves).

    I’m afraid I can’t write any follow up post for you, but I would suggest that clearly the hard working Google Android users must get up much earlier than the generally indolent WP7 users, and iOS users are just terribly, terribly modest. That’s my analysis, and you’re very welcome to use it.

  7. What made me want to post that asap was not just the flattering data behind the poll but that it came out of Wall Street Journal [online] readers, given how much the Windows Phone lovers tout its enterprise leverage or whatever to shove out the likes of BES machines from company server rooms across the nation really soon. Given that there had been plenty of votes at the time I captured the data in my post I’d say it was a kind of accurate representation of the WSJ’s online reader base, notwithstanding that they did it in Flash which shortchanged the Apple vote unfairly.

    By the time blogs like this picked it up all you people who’ve had nothing better to do but dream about a promised land completely different to your WM phones you all were unleashed to fluff this thing up with it making more and more MS sympathizing blogs as it gained its ground. And if you want to dabble into conspiracy theory territory, which company do you think would be more likely to pass the link to this poll around all their employees, Google or Microsoft? C’mon.

    That said, I suppose I’d better come up with a fresh site-wide poll for ourselves, this one’s getting dated.

  8. Um how about the company that drove cars around collecting the personal data from people.

    haha oh and let me just say an OS can be perceived as better or even better in actuality and still have short-comings that limit it for the enterprise world.

  9. “What made me want to post that asap was not just the flattering data behind the poll but that it came out of Wall Street Journal [online] readers, given how much the Windows Phone lovers tout its enterprise leverage or whatever to shove out the likes of BES machines from company server rooms across the nation really soon. Given that there had been plenty of votes at the time I captured the data in my post I’d say it was a kind of accurate representation of the WSJ’s online reader base,”

    I’d say that it’s somewhat naive to think that. Putting to one side that online polls are never representative to begin with, I regularly read the key sites for WM/WP, Android and iOS and the first post saying ‘oh – look at this poll, let’s all vote for our favourite OS’ that I found was on an Android site. That would suggest a reason for the huge Android lead just as much as reporting on WP sites suggests a reason for the WP catchup – and probably has little to do with the WSJ readership (would the Blackberry really have been so low all the way through otherwise?).

    “notwithstanding that they did it in Flash which shortchanged the Apple vote unfairly.”

    Indeed – between Android fans getting a heads up early, WP fans getting in on the act later, Blackberry users not tending to be all that excitable, WebOS users hard to find and iOS fans potentially shortchanged – we can’t seriously pretend that this poll tells us anything more than that there’s a lot of enthusiasm in general from smartphone users.

    The current results are no more a success for the new WP7 than the earlier ones were for Android.

    “By the time blogs like this picked it up all you people who’ve had nothing better to do but dream about a promised land completely different to your WM phones you all were unleashed to fluff this thing up with it making more and more MS sympathizing blogs as it gained its ground.”

    You people? I do find this ridiculous tribalism irritating. I’m all for enthusiasm for one’s chosen OS, but not to the extent of acting like it’s a banner of war. The only ‘war’ here should be between the OS producers as they try to better each other – and that’s one we all should benefit from.

    As for the ‘MS sympathising blogs’ – sure, that happened, but it also happened on a number of Android blogs too. Let’s not paint Windows Phone users as more or energised than Android users, or WP blogs as more likely to try and game a poll, ‘cos that isn’t reflective of reality. And as for ‘nothing better to do’ – we’re all in the blogosphere here, none of us can afford to be casting that stone…!

    Oh and, bearing in mind your ‘you people’ comment – I’m an Android user (Desire), so is my wife (Legend), so is my brother (Galaxy S) – and though my contract is up soon, I may be interested in a WP7 phone, but the Desire HD has been calling me powerfully and I haven’t decided where I’m going (except not to the iPhone – purely because it doesn’t give the me the ‘information first’ experience that appeals to me, rather than any anti iPhone thing). So my comments haven’t been as part of any group of WM dreamers. As I said above – I don’t like tribalism and I think we are fortunate to have two very strong OSes (iOS and Android) and one quite strong one with great potential (WP7).

    “And if you want to dabble into conspiracy theory territory, which company do you think would be more likely to pass the link to this poll around all their employees, Google or Microsoft? C’mon. ”

    There’s no need to dabble in conspiracy theory – we both acknowledge that these polls are gamed, of course they are, it happens openly. But on your question there – both just as likely I would say. Why would you think one would be more likely to do so than the other? Would Google really be any less or more inclined to encourage their employees to take part than MS would?

    I can see you seem to be trying to rescue something from this poll, some way to make the earlier result more valid than the current one, but it requires an unrealistic demonising of the makers and users of one OS (WM/WP7) than over the one you favour (Android) in order to do so.

    “That said, I suppose I’d better come up with a fresh site-wide poll for ourselves, this one’s getting dated. ”

    I wouldn’t. It just continues to encourage people to see this as an ideological war and will attract the same tribalistic calls to defend the honour of the [insert name here] OS as the WSJ one. What’s more – I suspect that WP7 will continue to punch above it’s weight in any poll right now simply because of the enthusiasm factor that comes from a new release – just as I suspect that Apple would have just after iOS 4 was launched and Android will after Gingerbread.

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