imageAs Microsoft has remained tight-lipped about sales of WP7 sales and as people need flame war ammunition, we’re seeing some innovation in the pursuit of that information. I have no idea who cooked this up (I’m guessing it’s someone who’s both very smart and has a ton of Adderall), (update yes I do, Pan Glozz) but here’s a spreadsheet breaking down how many, or what portion relative to the other platforms rather, WP7 devices accessed Facebook relative to the other major platforms entitled Estimate of WP7 sales through scraping Facebook App active user data: Windows Phone 7 uptake measured by Facebook volume. Nice long hyperlink this time because it’s worth a read or at least a glance.

For those of you not interested in being impressed by this guy’s advanced use of Google Docs and just want the figures, (spoiler alert – really, do check out the spreadsheet, challenge yourself), WP7 devices account for about 1.5% of the sales volume pie also eaten up by Androids, imageiPhones and Blackberries; WP7 devices have an installed base of less than a half a percent and its adoption rate has been definitively decelerating. Even our server logs, and this is a disturbingly Windows-heavy site, affirm that flattening. But it’s still a positive rate, so there’s that.

There’s a lot more data than that, about a hundred lines’ worth. For example, iPhones, if I’m reading this right, dethroned Android in sales however that is leveling back to parity. Damnit. More Blackberries out there still than Android? Well I won’t dwell on Android, back to WP7 devices which are outnumbered three to one by Windows Mobile 6.5 devices.

imageI don’t know about you but maybe you’re thinking “Well people who get X or Y are much more inclined to [whatever]” or perhaps “Will this jerk ever stop ripping on Windows” or “At least WP7 isn’t completely fragmented with a horrible app market and UI” but hey man, if you know of a better source of comparative sales stats than what this person is maintaining, something somehow less biased, do tell. Also tell me if I didn’t interpret these figures right so I can look less stupid and if anyone can figure out the name of whoever’s done and is continuing to do this, please share. By the way, I don’t mean any disrespect here but Chikita, one of these ad networks I think, is seeing about twice as many Windows 98 hits as WP7 ad pulls. Just throwing that out there.

Doug Simmons

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Biographical info.. hmm. I have a history of not being able to strike the balance between what is “safe” to put into these forms and what is, in my mind at least, funny. Can’t do it.

33 COMMENTS

  1. Sorry to say Simmons, No Dice. I have a Focus. There is no auto Facebook thingie. I don’t have a facebook. So I already invalidate this guys nice chart. I also had a live ID from back in the MS Money Software days. So you wouldn’t be able to look at new Live ID accounts to get a count. I know three other that have a WP7 without Facebook. What’s the big deal MS reports earnings shortly and they will have to give WP7 sales figures. What everyone needs to be asking is: Will those numbers be released with Xbox 360 entertainment or under Windows software figures.

  2. I don’t see anything either accelerating or decelerating there. WP7 added some 500K devices on FB in some 60 days, which means around 8K users per day. There was a peak during the two last weaks in december with a little over 10K users per day, and a low during the first 11 days of January at some 6K users per day, with growth returning to a little over 8K at the end of the data set.

    And what’s this “auto launched client method” you’re talking about? The FB client in the People hub? It’s not really auto launched unless you enter your FB credentials. Also, if you use Windows Live (which will also show info from FB), it’ll be pulled by WL web service first, so that’ll be the client FB will see. It won’t be accounted in these stats. How big of an effect that’ll be I have no clue, frankly. May be negligible (who uses Windows Live?), may be big (lots of people use WL Messenger Social, I hear).

    The funny thing isn’t even this. The funny thing is that if you compare WP7’s 8K/day to Android’s 130K/day, that’ll give you a difference of 16X in favor of Android. Sounds big? It sure does. But – think about this: how many operators carry Android devices vs WP7? How many phone models are there with Android? If you think about it for a second, 16X suddenly isn’t that huge of a difference for a platform that just kicked off.

    I have no clue whether WP7 will succeed or fail, but this data certainly doesn’t show failure.

    Unless I mixed things up, it’s 2:30am here…

  3. Hey, it’s good to have a baseline to work from. Let’s talk again next October-November. Will WP7 be #1. No, it won’t. Does it matter, not particularly. Unless you are so competitive that’s all that matters. Everything changes. Bing is nibbling away at market share. WP7’s baby teeth are just coming in. Give it time to mature.

  4. Thanks for the props.
    News today is APPL device sales for the Oct-Dec quarter.
    These include 16M iphone, 7M iPad, and about 8M iPod Touch. All these would scrape in the facebook user stats as iPhone. So 31 or 32M new iOS devices and about 11 M new Facebook User accounts using the iOS user agent. This indicates a device attachment of about 35% (FB delta stat/total new units). Undoubtably large numbers of the iOS are from multi-device owners, and the FB counts user units not device.

    The attach rate of the WP7 is going to greater than iOS, based on 1) lack of multi-device factor, 2) default screen prompt, 3) my “daily active user/monthly active user” ratio indicating the WP7 user is a daily user at 83% rate (higher than any other device). Guestimating the attach factor at 60% would give a total “in the wild” number for WP7 of 560,000.

  5. Panglozz: I appreciate your stopping by and making more sense of this.

    Bennyj: I just flipped through earnings reports back to 2005. Seems they only mention Windows Mobile or even any reference to mobile when it wasn’t that embarrassing. I didn’t look through every one, but can you find one in the recent few years that says anything that’s even lightly specific about revenues relating to mobile operations? Wouldn’t they just stuff it into something like “entertainment and devices division to blend its failure in with their other products and services that could also fit such a vague description? Keep in mind that Windows Mobile is still bigger than WP7, but it seems they get to pick and choose when to comment on their mobile operations, like this from July 2007: “Mobile and Embedded Devices revenue increased $138 million or 28% driven by sales growth in Windows Mobile software and Windows Embedded operating systems.”

    You don’t see much on mobile, let alone Windows Mobile, after that. Which makes me think the only way you’re going to get numbers on WP7 sales as you expect to in the next report, unless I don’t know how to read these statements perhaps, is if everyone weighing in on WP7’s dismal performance thus far is WAY off, from someone like me to people reblogging the probably made up but maybe incidentally on-par 40K launch number to websites tipping their hands and showing the lack of WP7 on their server logs to all these ad networks reporting the same story, that WP7 isn’t on the map. Hell it’s nowhere near what all you old Windows Mobile fanatics (I was one) would rather forget. Look at this spreadsheet, look at forum activity. There is no evidence that I’ve heard, other than wishful thinking, to refute the evidence that it’s still being towered over by platform that is the butt of jokes and pretty much forgotten, that there’s virtually no indication that this will take off other than some let-it-ride optimism.

    Sounds big? It sure does. But – think about this: how many operators carry Android devices vs WP7? How many phone models are there with Android? If you think about it for a second, 16X suddenly isn’t that huge of a difference for a platform that just kicked off.

    I don’t know if you were tuned in but AT&T didn’t even mention, not once, WP7 at the CES. Not once. Everything else (mostly Android I believe, not much else, and no WP7). Need a citation for that or could you take my word as if you think about it, it kinda sounds about right? Everyone’s talking about Android this and 4G that and Verizon iPhones and the iPhone 5 and iPad 2. Why are you convinced that that will change, that WP7 will rob the market share, eventually, from the major players when Windows Mobile miserably failed to do that? Hell, LG’s marketing strategy and planning team director is on record stating this: “From an industry perspective we had a high expectation, but from a consumer point of view the visibility is less than we expected.”

    If I recall a Microsoft exec doing some interview, and I could dig this up if you’d like, answered “I don’t know, maybe two years” to when WP would be regarded as a contender in this market. And for all we know the man was exaggerating.

    WP7 kicked off a while ago. I’ve got $50 coming in from a year-old bet with our resident WP7 writer from taking the side that Android would outsell WP7 Q1 this year (he’s no longer going to wait it out to pay up). He thought this would be a blockbuster now, maybe you did too. How long do you suggest we ought to wait until using words like flop to describe Microsoft’s mobile efforts when faced with signs like this isn’t premature?

  6. Doug: I appreciate you doing some research, but you missed my statement. I said some reports should be asking about the figures when they report their financials. As far as the 40k number you like to toss around, what about the 1.5 million in six weeks figure? I mean since some guy has made a chart that I don’t fit in gets mentioned. The worst part Doug is that you are probably the wrong person to write this article. After all the Nexus One (the phone you have mentioned several times as changing your mindset) sold what 150,000. Everyone was saying that was the death of Android. “Surely, if the Google Phone can’t sell the platform has no future” was on every blog site.Up until last month you sung the praises of that phone. After all, keep it real, Verizon’s Droid marketing built Android. That didn’t diminish the enjoyment you had for your device. So as someone who was in a similar boat, I expect better.

    Oh yeah, less not forget- Palm Pre will challenge the Iphone! Pre was the darling of the blogshere. I have never seen a real Palm Pre in my life! When they were in stores all I saw were demos(which happens a lot), but I’ve never seen anyone with one.

  7. @Doug Simmons:

    I have no idea how much of this lower than hoped for sales volume you can lay at the feet of AT&T, but to not mention WP7 at CES is pretty damning of MS’s decision to enter and push the WP7 market with AT&T partner.

    And from my personal experience this past weekend, I went to the AT&T store in Newton MA with my college son to get him in iPhone. Although my son wouldn’t have anything to do with a Windows platform, being a very happy owner of a Focus I asked the sales manager on the floor about the WP7 phones, and he flat out told me that they (WP7 phones) would have to be the last phones in the store for him to sell to a customer. He would sell Android (I think he said he uses the Samsung Android phone they sell) and iPhones all day long before mentioning a WP7 phone to a customer. And this is the sales partner that’s presumably marketing and selling your phones Microsoft? Redmond, we have a problem here.

  8. For what it’s worth, the first few weeks after launch I visited a few local AT&T stores in addition to the two local Best Buy stores looking for cases, screen protectors, and other accessories for my Samsung Focus. The AT&T stores (again, the “premier WP7 launch partner” according to Microsoft, had next to nothing in-store that I could walk out with for the first 3-4 weeks. They offered to order one of the three or four cases AT&T offered online, but I could do that myself. Mind you, these rubber slip cases were $34.99 if I remember correctly.

    AT&T just began carrying ZAGG screen protectors about 2 or 3 weeks ago for the Focus, but only the “Dry” variant, rather than the traditional “smooth” screen shield that I prefer. The Best Buy was even worse, not only had they no accessories for the Samsung Focus, but 4 weeks after launch they still weren’t even selling ANY Windows Phone 7 devices! They had one case for the HTC Surround. That was it. I’m so exhausted of checking in with them on the status of Windows Phone 7 devices and accessories that I’ve given up and haven’t checked since December.

    Oddly enough, despite the lack of sales channel actively pushing the device, every mobile phone sales rep I’ve encountered (at 4 AT&T stores, and the 2 Best Buys) all inquire about how I like the phone, what features I like best, etc. Most will admit that they are looking for what features they can promote when selling to other customers, but that they haven’t used the phone enough to know. I suspect that AT&T is so laser-focused (no pun intended) on the iPhone that they have no desire to push Windows Phone 7, even though they’re about to lose that flagship phone’s exclusivity to Verizon. The you-know-what is hitting the fan in about 3 weeks and AT&T is missing an excellent opporunity to capitalize on what could be the “next big thing” since they, for all intents and purposes (along with T-Mobile as an also-ran), have GSM/UMTS exclusivity on Windows Phone 7 at least until Microsoft rolls out NoDo with CDMA support, which in itself is another issue plaguing the platform and may be more detrimental to its future sales than AT&T’s apathetic promotion of the platform.

    Finally, let me point out that I have seen one individual in my own town (of about 30,000 people) using a Windows Phone 7, a Focus about 3 weeks ago. A sales rep I’ve gotten to know at the local AT&T store tells me that they sold through their initial stock within the first 7-10 days, but I haven’t checked with her since then. This article has piqued my curiosity again and I may stop in AT&T and Best Buy this week to find out if I’ve missed anything since Christmas. Sadly, I suspect I will be told nothing has changed and Windows Phone 7 will continue to be relegated to the backseat while the iPhone on Verizon and Android enjoy center-stage in 2011.

  9. You said it Gary. AT&T has done the minimum necessary to meet their contractual obligations with Microsoft. And that’s sad, because aside from some v1.0 jitters, it is a good product. Hopefully Microsoft is ready to spend some real coins at this year’s SuperBowl. Despite the carrier’s reluctance, MS needs to compel users to ask for these phones, or mail out 10MM coupons. Whatever works.

  10. Jimski: Minimum contractual obligations? This is what the suits at Microsoft thought would get the job done, launching the platform? Feels more likely based on the first experiences we told each other about the day of the launch when a few of us bought it and then subsequent days, I was struck by AT&T’s performance. I was really expecting the opposite, I thought Microsoft was going all in on this.

    Seriously Bennyj? You’re butthurt because I said it would be nice to have more to go on than ad distributor statistics, bloggers, some 40K claim that many (including David K from this site) ran with which I said may have been made up … Want me to edit the article to throw in another random number for you so it’s less distracting for you? Was that a cheap shot somehow?

    They call it a launch for a reason, things that are launched tend to go upwards quickly in order to nestle into orbit (or shoot the moon). It’s important to get that escape velocity otherwise you get something like what we’re seeing and yes, the Nexus One, which by the way was/is a fine craft except Google figured they’d try some new launch method to keep it reusable for years. It felt like for every Windows Phone AT&T advertisement I saw four Blackberry Torch ads. Why Microsoft wouldn’t do whatever it took to have AT&T go nuts with their platform rather than treat it like some random pre-paid phone is baffling given all the apparent general energy, effort and presumably money went into this. It’s almost as if whoever sat down with AT&T said “Hey AT&T we ran the numbers and even though this thing’s great, those critics saying we’re too late to the party are right so let’s just put enough into the campaign to look as though we tried so we don’t offend our developers too much as this situation would not be easy to explain to them.”

    I don’t need to check Google Finance to know Microsoft has plenty of cash, enough to give this thing a real debut, and this wasn’t the kind of experiment the Nexus One was. Windows Mobile served as their experiment. Google experiments a lot, the Nexus One being no exception, selling a phone themselves and denying it the usual channels, trying to blaze a trail. Didn’t work out to well so now they’re trying a Best Buy understocking approach under the smallest carrier. Whatever. So Google experiments chronically whereas Microsoft, they sleep at the wheel chronically.

    But I’d argue that I’m not in your boat because, after spending countless hours on making WinMo resource websites which helped a lot of people by the way, I bailed out of Microsoft and Windows to Android and Google, the two best things about my phone which are not entirely unique to that phone. Same thing my new phone has and as far as I’m concerned I have not yet passed a New Yorker who owns a better phone — and by the way, especially being a subway rider, I see a lot of phones and not one of them was WP7, or WinMo. It was love at first touch, me and Google’s Android and Nexus. But even if I were in your boat where I could get away with expectations I’m otherwise falling short of because I’m not Windows anymore, what the hell does that matter — I found something that was very impressive, a new way of estimating sales, one that doesn’t involve you relying on someone like AdMob to tell you how many impressions of their ads were served to which platform last quarter. You’d prefer that certain things not go on this blog unless their written by the writer you deem appropriate? I’m going to go out on a limb here and call that mentality consistent with that of a douchebag, making me rant like this.

    And Bennyj I appreciate that you’ve been keeping track of me, that’s touching, but if you look really hard you’d see that I’ve made it clear that this is somewhat to my chagrin as I’d like to think we’re in a world where the better the thing you have the less something like AT&T screw ups will weigh down your product from achieving success. And I’ve heard nothing but praise, almost nothing but praise about the software and phones (sales notwithstanding). Also, I’ve admitted to being a shareholder of Microsoft (the stock doesn’t go up but hey, dividends) in addition to Apple and Google, so any joy I got out of seeing this thing fail would at least be partially hedged by the wealth I’d lose were this to tank versus WP completing the circle of arrays of products and services Microsoft offers. But I’m surrounded by hypersensitive and defensive schmucks so it’s hard not to come off arrogant here. Enemy territory.

    Let’s pretend you’re definitely right that Android is only a success because Verizon began to like it then liked where it was going then figured it could go further and embraced it progressively harder. Well great, there’s your strategy Microsoft, pay at least one carrier to go nuts with the thing, give them out for free, give them out for free with a billion minutes, negotiate some deal with the White House to get Obama to put down the Blackberry and use Focus, do whatever it takes to launch the damn platform. Why didn’t they do it? Maybe you’re wrong about the level of Verizon’s importance to Android, maybe both Microsoft and AT&T were incompetent or got distracted. Or maybe you’re just wrong in thinking that Microsoft is not in fact too late to this party, you’re wrong that giving it time will earn it the share it deserves. But who cares, right, you don’t need everyone to own your phone in order to like your phone. But maybe it does help when you have enough interest in your platform for your OEMs to want to keep this Windows Phone project rolling another round with the next batch of phones (if you were an OEM with the perfect phone but just needed to pick a platform, would you honestly go with WP7 in order to feed your family?), also for your platform, on its own, to attract developers rather than paying developers off left and right to port their software. Hopefully that well doesn’t run dry before they can run a few more Focus spots.

  11. @Doug Simmons:

    Why are you convinced that that will change, that WP7 will rob the market share, eventually, from the major players when Windows Mobile miserably failed to do that?

    Eh, I’m not convinced in anything like that. I see that the product has potential, so things can change, but the product itself isn’t enough, and it’s not there yet. Microsoft still has to do lots of things right in order for this to materialize.

    All I’m saying is that the numbers aren’t bad at all, selling one WP7 device for every 16 Androids sold is very decent if you account for operator availability, incredibly poor language support, customer awareness, awful naming and all the missing check marks in the product feature list (users may not need multitasking that much, but it has to be there if only for PR purposes). Most people look at it in a very binary way – they expect it to be either a Kin or an iPhone 4. It’s neither of those, and it’s good.

    How long do you suggest we ought to wait until using words like flop to describe Microsoft’s mobile efforts when faced with signs like this isn’t premature?

    The product launch was a flop, I personally have no doubts about it. A failed launch does not a failed mobile effort make, however. Most new product launches fail, actually. Especially if you’re talking about Microsoft whose poor marketing skills are famous. They are trying to make a polished product (which they never did before), and do a “pull” strategy (i.e. hoping to create enough end user demand via word of mouth/ads, as opposed to stimulating distribution). When you do polished products you’re slow to add features, and creating demand is slow, especially when you don’t have skills/brand to begin with.

    Can they pull it off? I don’t know. I know they can.

    Hell, LG’s marketing strategy and planning team director is on record stating this: “From an industry perspective we had a high expectation, but from a consumer point of view the visibility is less than we expected.”

    I don’t know what kind of expectations “the industry” had, but if they thought it would take anything less than a couple of years for it to become more than an experiment inconsequential from real money perspective, they are dreamers. It took Android about two years in a much better environment.

    AT&T didn’t even mention, not once, WP7 at the CES. Not once.

    Because WP7 is an inconsequential also-ran at this point of time.

  12. This is all a shame, because the bottom line is that I *love* my Focus. Love the operating system. Just got our IT director at our firm to switch from iPhone 3 to a Focus, and she loves it and says how it blows away her iPhone. And so MS ends up with a “Premier launch partner” that doesn’t give a damn about selling any of these. Too bad.

  13. Doug, I engage you in an honest discussion but you resort to name calling. This isn’t the first article I disagreed with your point. Hell your article on Copy and Paste I totally agreed with. Ok, you posted a chart that wasn’t an ADMob, as I said I don’t use facbook. There is no auto Facebbok app. So the basis he used is flawed. The speaks to him not you. Secondly, I own Apple stock as well as Google. I have owned Microsoft since they announced the dividend some years back. My point was Android got it’s footing with the Verizon Droid ads. People that come to these sites are the exception, most people had no idea about Android. Heck must of friends that have Android phones(on the Sprint network) call it Droid. Here we sit two months after launch in the US, and all I hear is the death of WP. I never said it would or wouldn’t suceed. Meanwhile, Google TV has had similar disappointments after its first few months. Is it doomed, don’t know. Look at Apple TV. I read so many articles how crappy the sales but Apple keeps working on it. I don’t anyone pushing that not even Apple,lol. As for the forums, my 13 year old nephew has an Iphone so I read up on forums to learn what apps or tricks people use to enhance their experience. Most Iphone forums are sparse because they are less people complaining. That’s the sad state. WM had many sites and forums as you even stated because of complaints. I’ve had few complaints with my phone, so no need to post. How many times have posted in the forums about your Nexus phones? So I’ll leave it at that Doug, Hope to talk to you on next article.

  14. Doug Simmons:
    and you won’t be you who say that this is a failure, the fandroid must be outside of the discussion and you should write an article style profiles for knowledge that makes people buy a horrific as android phone, but here is what I say: If a so ugly s.o and so shit sells (android) the more vendera wp7 is Heaven compared to fragandoid

  15. Well yeah, the contract said provide a kiosk with WP7 phones prominently displayed near the front of the store. But it didn’t say that AT&T can’t store boxes in front of it or use it as an employee lunch counter. AT&T is missing out and they will figure this out soon enough when the tide turns. It will cost them dearly, but my guess is you are not holding any ATT stock so no worries.

    You said it. The Nexus One was an experiment that didn’t work out all that well. I consider everything up till now with WP7 to be part of the pre-launch. After the first update and after 2/13 things will begin to build, but the “real” launch won’t be till Q3, when language support, new devices, and a bunch of other goodies get released. Sure, I would have loved WP7 to be an instant success, but I am not the least bit disappointed being an early adopter in this case. Actually relatively painless. The way I see it, everyone else is the loser.

  16. Jimski,

    It is a logical error to say, “I don’t use facebook, therefore a usage share estimate using facebook is flawed”.

    You may argue, “WP7 users are less likely to use FB, so usage share does not correspond to the ratio of activated phones”.

    However, there is no evidence that would be a true statement. The Daily/Monthly ratio is high for WP7 (and Palm)– this may be an effect of a small and relatively fresh user base– but it supports the supposition that WP7 users are at least as likely to be FB users as the general Smartphone population.

    Netmarketshare.com data shows a similar iOS/Android/BB ratio as the FB scrape. So this is an independent corroboration that the FB scrape is measuring aggregate user behavoir for the major platforms.

    Will the WP7 user base grow: Of Course. Will it converge on the delta proportion in the uptake measures, yes. That argues in the absence of a change in consumer selection, WP7 will hover at 1% market share of Smart phones.

  17. Well yeah, the contract said provide a kiosk with WP7 phones prominently displayed near the front of the store. But it didn’t say that AT&T can’t store boxes in front of it or use it as an employee lunch counter. AT&T is missing out and they will figure this out soon enough when the tide turns. It will cost them dearly, but my guess is you are not holding any ATT stock so no worries.

    How will it cost them dearly? They pretty much don’t care what to sell as long as subscribers buy similar data plans, don’t bother them with returns and support calls too much, people don’t come back throwing crappy devices in their face and run away to VZW, if the level of subsidies is more or less the same. So if customers walk away with an Android phone or a Blackberry, why should they worry? I don’t think they have any hard commitments towards either Google or Microsoft that will cost them much, if anything, if they don’t meet agreed targets. If WP7 takes off for real in a year or two months or three years, they will surely change their attitude. If it doesn’t… RIP. They don’t give a damn. Android may be even slightly better because they can make money on search deals and such nonsense, in theory.

    Either way, this was always the case – operators don’t sell phones, they sell voice and data plans, so that’s their priority. That MS put their platform’s fate in AT&T’s hands is their own fault. Or maybe they didn’t even have a choice. The result is what it is, and it won’t change until MS either succeed in building end user demand or change their model so as to make their platform aimed at sales channels rather than end users (a-la WM/Android).

  18. That argues in the absence of a change in consumer selection, WP7 will hover at 1% market share of Smart phones.

    According to the data in the spreadsheet, WP7 user base grows at some 2800% rate annualized, compared to Android’s ~300% and iPhone’s ~100%. There’s no reason to say that this rate will continue through 2011, or even next month, but there’s no reason to say that it’ll fall to its competitors’ growth rate next week either.

    I would urge anyone who considers the small numbers as a prediction of the platform’s failure to think again. Low awareness, AT&T only, poor (or even negative) brand equity, poor launch, AT&T sales staff indifference, poor press due to lack of C&P and such, and with all that baggage it still moves up. Even with all this stuff, if you added VZW it would double its share in the US, for example. Expand it to all markets, add languages, and leave everything else “as is”, and you’ll see that even in its present shape it could easily sell one WP7 for every 8 or even 3-5 Androids. And that’s first few months of its life.

    MS can totally screw it or make a big success, that remains to be seen, but there’s absolutely no sign of doom in gloom in these numbers.

  19. Bennyj: I apologize for the name calling. I got fired up, just like Windows phone admirers get fired up when you post an article about a new way of measuring how devices are selling relative to one another based not on ad serving with stats published by outfits possibly with agendas and different and changing deals or buyouts they have with other companies.

    Hard to come up with a thing for which more of us have in common than Facebook. Maybe iphone users use per capita facebook more on their phones than blackberry owners do on their phones but those proportions relative to one another may remain pretty solid.

    I was quite taken by Panglozz’s methods, moreso than the actual findings which is why I made an effort to get people to pull up the data and the public source of that data. This was a real find. Only found two instances of Pan plugging the data which makes me think he has no ulterior motives one way or another. Sort of like me and my batteryboss site but I have to admit it became exciting to exose exaggeration and sometimes flagrant fraud. I didn’t do anything to skew data, but still, I wanted eyes on my data, i paid up for a heavy duty server in hopes of getting slashdotted etc where as Pan made a google docs spreadsheet revealing quite possibly the mistmost unbiased and most accurate a barometer of changes in sales of varivarious things (delta?).

    I swear on my mother’s eyes I would have posted this even if WP was gaining on or destroying Android.

    But I know from watching server logs of many different sites that getting people to click anything on a site isn’t easy, especially links to other sites, so I included the figures of greatest interest and fascination. Also I was looking for random animal pictures and the polar bear just seemed to fit. Nevertheless the article juso doesn’t read like an assault on Microsoft or those who got and love their Focus. So it’s because the Android guy wr te the article that’s got people fired up? In addition to the wp7 figures I also reveal that this data indicates Apple put a hurting on Google, my darling Google.

  20. If any of you, until MS starts disclosing these numbers at least, find yourself wanting to know how Android is selling after the Verizon iphone debuts or want to see if Wp7’s sales are picking up, would you not turn to this source?

  21. @Doug Simmons: “So it’s because the Android guy wr te the article that’s got people fired up?”

    If you constantly come off as an ass, you will constantly get treated like an ass. I try to give you the benefit of doubt, but in the end you will resort to the “tl;dr I’m an ass” comment. As for the mother’s eyes swear, I assuming your mother has replaceable eyes because you will never post anything positive because you’re a one-trick pony.

  22. I would take LG’s comments with a serious grain of salt. Who in their right mind is going to actually buy the crappy looking hardware they created? Go ahead, make my day, and I will laugh for days when you say, “I would!”

    Of course they are disappointed, join the community of consumers who are extremely disappointed that someone would actually attempt to market phones that don’t even look good enough for demo machines!

  23. Aww man, yss, a one trick pony? … you’re not helping my self esteem but at least I have one trick; but what is that trick specifically? In addition to this trick you’re referring to, my mind, when I flip through what I’ve contributed to this site up front with the writing and in back with making sure the shit runs smoothly, it tricks me into thinking, in spite of all your analyses of me, I think Damn, I’m fairly good at this considering this is a hobby, for lack of a better word to indicate that we’re not getting paid to do this, and I’m a key member of this team.

    My long comments are generally not tl;dr and you know it. You read it. Sometimes I do offer a tl;dr for people who might not be able to handle the tl. Otherwise calling me out when you don’t even read what I write, unless it’s to accuse me of using run-on sentences, …. whatever… tl:dr: yss this was a solid post and ffs stop breaking my balls.

    super2online: Sounds about right. For each LG-E5900 hit we receive we get over twenty Focus hits. With such a discrepancy it’s hard not to think that overall the Focus is not simply the better phone and had it been better somehow to match the Focus maybe this LG man would have seen his expectations fulfilled. Relatively speaking at least. Or maybe he’s pissed at T-Mobile and whoever else was hawking the phones. Or maybe there are other people who like me just would feel uneasy buying a phone with that brand regardless of the specs and reviews.

  24. “Jimski: Minimum contractual obligations? This is what the suits at Microsoft thought would get the job done, launching the platform? Feels more likely based on the first experiences we told each other about the day of the launch when a few of us bought it and then subsequent days, I was struck by AT&T’s performance. I was really expecting the opposite, I thought Microsoft was going all in on this.

    Seriously Bennyj? You’re butthurt”

    Stopped reading. Read carefully “in the end you will resort to the “tl;dr I’m an ass” comment.” Never said I didn’t read any comments. Reading is fundamental.

    As for the “one-trick pony”, you write an post hoping to incite the WP7 users (or WM6x users). You write more about WP7, which you claim not to have and not to want, than that POS Google TV that you were suckered into buying. Ok, post whatever you want just keep it real. Naw, you can’t because you want to be Mr.GooglewithFroyoonmychinandIthinkI’mthebaneofeveryWP7user’sexistence. Someone hits you with a valid point, it’s you who have to go there. Overly abrasive, overly sensitive… Your passionate about what you write, right? ____ ridiculous.

    And stop the self-congratulations BS. This is a solid post because of Pan’s work and others holding a solid debate.

  25. Yes, minimal contractual obligations. AT&T’s job was to display WP7 phones in a separate kiosk prominently in their stores and they have done just that. Not much more. Now its Microsoft’s job to convince consumers to go into those stores and ask for a Windows Phone. Not on the MS WP7 team so don’t know how they are going to do that but I do expect they have a plan. My guess is things are close to what they expected. We can theorize all day but Microsoft is holding all the cards right now.

  26. In the interests of theorizing further, let’s say this fell short of what they expected, do you get the feeling that getting people to buy the phones has become much less of a priority for Microsoft than it had been leading up to November, something they might do were they to conclude they’d get a better return by spending some of these resources elsewhere?

  27. […] prompted me to write this is was not last week’s severe outage. I was checking out my favorite indicator of what’s selling and what ain’t in order to stock up on more ammo to rip on the WP […]

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